Evgeniia Ginzburg

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Ginzburg, Evgeniia (1904-1977). Krutoi Marshrut (Journey into the Whirlwind).

Arrested and condemned to ten years prison later change to hard labour for counter-revolutionary terrorism Ginzburg lost not only her husband but also her eldest soon to the terror of the Soviet régime.
As a member of the intelligentsia, a school-teacher, journalist and a Party member Ginzburg peppered her memoirs with quotations from the greats of Russian literature; Pasternak, Tsvetaeva, Nekrasov and Blok among others. Not only banned in Russia but treated as a severe betrayal of Soviet ideology, her memoirs treated the chaos of Soviet and disarray of Soviet Russia with not only a fiercely critical eye but from the viewpoint of someone who wanted to understand how and why such a thing could come about. Using her very carefully literary Russian Ginzburg A 1967 Russian edition varied her language with prison jargon, colloquialisms, bureaucratic doublespeak and abbreviations as well as Russian proverbs; the Russian language edition published in Milan in 1967 is famously wrought with mistakes and typos which made further translation notoriously difficult.
Circulated in manuscript and mimeographed samizdat in Moscow Ginzburg’s text eventually made it to the West where it was first published in the Milanese Russian language edition and then into multiple languages quickly becoming a point of reference for the terror Stalinism brought to the lives of its most unquestioning followers and even the families of its highest placed officials.

Our samizdat contains Part One – complete with a list of contents and also six chapters of part Two. Was discovered buried in the grounds of a State asylum outside Moscow.

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