Darko Suvin

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(6110) Suvin, Darko Ronald (1930-). “The Poetics of the Science Fiction Genre: An Approach” and “Introduction. The Development of the Strugatskys’ Fiction”.

Original typescript. 27 pages bound with original paperclip. 27,7cm. Samizdat dated 1979.

Born in 1930 in Zagreb Suvin lived in Canada from 1968 to his retirement before settling down in Italy. Professor Emeritus of English literature at McGill University in Montreal he is best known in literary and academic circles for his studies in science-fiction, including his definitive “Bibliography of Soviet Science Fiction 1956-1974” (1976). In addition to developing what has been called a Yugoslav Marxist reading of sci-fi, Suvin played a vital role in bringing the new Iron Age of Soviet science fiction to the attention of the West and his essays on the revitalised genre like “The Utopian Tradition of Soviet Science Fiction” (The Modern Language Review, 1971) did much to bring new authors to a Western audience. While these two typewritten texts by Suvin reached the USSR where Suvin’s work on the Strugatskii brothers was eagerly awaited it’s prticularly interesting to note that, to this day, none of Suvin’s works have been published in Russia.

1) “The Poetics of the Science Fiction Genre: An Approach”.

Photocopy of an original typescript. 17 pages bound with original paperclip. 27,7cm. Samizdat dated 1979. English language.
“Pour une poétique de la science-fiction : études en théorie et en histoire d’un genre littéraire” (Montreal 1977) — although originally written in French, it seems this version was translated from the English manuscript.
“Metamorphoses of Science Fiction: On the Poetics and History of a Literary Genre” (1979)

2) “Introduction: The Development of the Strugatskys’ Fiction”.

Original typescript, 1st copy. 27 pages bound with original paperclip. 27,7cm. Samizdat dated 1979. English language.
With original corrections by Suvin himself and sent by the author to a known Russian critic, this samizdat made its way through several readers before falling into the hands of our collector. A Russian translation, also in samizdat, was circulated through fans of the science-fiction genre.

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