Vladimir Aleinikov

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(5213) Aleïnikov Vladimir 1946-

“Zvezda Ostrovitian” (“L’étoile des Insulaires”)

I. “Pevchiï v Khore Nezemnom” 1979

II. “Voskresaia v Ogne” 1979

III. “Vechnoie Chudo Otkrytiia” 1979

IV. “Byt’ Muzyke” 1979-1980

2 collections of poetry from the years 1979-1980. 22,5cm

I. Original author’s typescript, 27 pages on different papers. Pages 1-44 numbered and typed by the author recto-verso. 1 original illustration in black and white. Signed and dated may 1980. The cover is a sheet of newspaper sheet from 1971.

II. Original author’s typescript. 33 pages on different papers. Pages 1-60 are numbered and typed by the author recto-verso. 1 original illustration in blue ink. The cover also consists of a sheet of newspaper from 1971.

Samizdat  straight from the personal collection of the poet.

A long-standing friend of Leonid Gubanov with whom he co-founded the avant-garde group SMOG which alternately stood for “The Young Society of Genuises” and as an acronym of “Smelost’, Mysl’, Obraz, Glubina” (Courage, Thoughts, Images, Depth) along with Arkady Pakhomov and Vladimir Batsh. As someone on whom censorship leaned heavily it would naturally follow that Aleinikov find the renown and wide audience that he did through diffusing his texts in samizdat. Hailed by his contemporaries as being the greatest poet of the second half of the twentieth century.

Having spent his childhood in Ukraine and having published in Ukrainian periodicals it was when he moved to Moscow during Khruschev’s persecution of the formalists that Aleinikov was brought to the attention of the authorities for his open challenges to the régime’s cultural policies in the press. His poetry began to appear in publications abroad and when his work began to be broadcast on the radio in the West the official reprisal was fierce and unrelenting. As part of the harassment Aleinikov was expelled from Moscow State University as well as from the Komsomol and publication of any of his poems was strictly prohibited. Luckily through word of mouth and with the aid of his contemporary poets and the dissident network Aleinikov’s literary and artistic activities grew. Having to sometimes support himself through working menial jobs government harassment never ceased and the few writing jobs he was allowed to undertake consisted of radio and tv work as well as the occasional children’s piece which he would illustrate himself. The severity of his punishment at the hands of the authorities is worth underlining as in Aleinikov we have the best example of the effectiveness of the relatively small samizdat readership. Although entirely clandestine and with very real physical consequences samizdat permitted artistic expression often without any prior knowledge of the artist. From the hands of the author (as is our samizdat which comes from the personal archive of the author himself) the texts carried recognition far beyond anywhere the poet had ever been.

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Aleinikov, Vladimir. Sikhotvoreniia.

Original author’s typescript, 17 stapled pages on assorted papers, mostly onionskin. 21 x 30cm. Numbered and typed by the author recto with original illustrations interspersed throughout. Each page initialed by the author. All poems dated 1973

Titled poems included:

Groza Izdaleka
Groza Velizi
Peterburgsko Noch’iu
Uzhe Sentiabr’
Pred Oktiabrem

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Aleinikov, Vladimir. Sikhotvoreniia.

Original author’s typescript, 14 stapled pages on assorted papers, mostly onionskin. 21 x 30cm. Numbered and typed by the author recto with original illustrations interspersed throughout. Each page initialed by the author. Directly from the personal archive of the poet.

Poems dated from 1964 to 1967, titled poems include:

Posviashchaetsia oseni
Parad pochtal’onov
List’ia

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